more


more
more
1. For more and most used in the comparison of adjectives, see adjective 3–4. With adverbs, more and most are normally used when the adverb is formed with -ly from an adjective, e.g. more richly, more happily: see -er and -est forms. The use of double comparatives, e.g. They are more happier now, though once a feature of English style (and used for example by Shakespeare), has fallen out of use and is considered illiterate.
2. more than one.
This phrase, though plural in form and meaning, conventionally takes a singular verb: More than one doctor attends each patient. However, if the number following than is higher than one, or if the phrase is couched in the form more + plural noun + than, then the whole phrase moves into the plural: More than two doctors attend each patient / More doctors than one attend each patient. The same happens if more than one is followed by of and a plural noun or pronoun: More than one of the doctors attend each patient.
3. many more.
Care needs to be taken to avoid the ambiguity of constructions in which many more is followed by an adjective. In the sentence Many more important tasks had to be done, it is unclear whether more belongs with many or with important, i.e. whether all the tasks were important or only the additional ones. In speech, intonation usually clarifies the intended sense, but confusion can be caused when this kind of construction appears in written form.
4. the more.
More is preceded by the in certain idiomatic uses. The is optional in the type She is the more intelligent of the two, and obligatory in the set type The more, the merrier, and when preceded by all (It is all the more interesting for being new).
5. For more important and more importantly, see important, importantly.

Modern English usage. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

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